North Carolina Teenager Car Insurance: Everything You Need To Know

In 2010, there were 218 fatal crashes involving teen drivers. Over the past five years, accidents involving teen drivers claimed 1,283 lives in North Carolina. To combat this tragic problem, North Carolina has adopted a three-stage graduated licensing system. When Can Teens Drive in North Carolina? You can begin shopping for North Carolina teenager car insurance when your child is 15 years old. At this time, he or she is eligible to receive a learner’s permit. After one year of experience, your teen will be able to move up to the intermediate stage. During this time, your teen may NOT drive between…

Florida No Fault Car Insurance: Important Facts About Coverage

There is much confusion about what it means to drive in a “no fault” state like Florida. Yet, understanding the law is crucial in the selection of Florida no fault car insurance. In basic terms, your insurance company will pay for your medical bills following an accident — even if it was the other driver’s fault. This saves you from worrying about pursuing litigation or dealing with uninsured motorists. Property Damage Liability Car Insurance In Florida Everyone who owns a vehicle in Florida must carry at least $10,000 in Personal Injury Protection. PIP benefits are paid to you by your own insurance…

Classic Car Insurance In New York: What You Need To Know

Collectible “classic” cars refer to any motor vehicle manufactured before 1972. Your vehicle may also qualify if it is a convertible, rare foreign car, modified vehicle, two-door sports car, or vehicle with a V8 block engine. There are special car insurance rules if you own a classic car in New York State. What Is Different About Classic Car Insurance In NY? Unlike contemporary cars that decrease in value over time, classic cars actually increase in value over time. You may also encounter more expensive repair bills, should your vehicle get into an accident, so that may affect the cost of your car insurance too….

SR 22 Car Insurance In North Carolina: Get The Important Facts Before Buying

North Carolina is one of the few U.S. states that do not require SR-22 car insurance. The “SR” in SR-22 stands for “Safety Responsibility.” This document is filed by your car insurance company and submitted to the state to prove that you have the minimum required liability coverage. Who Needs To Show Their SR-22? In states other than North Carolina, you may be asked to show your SR-22 to reinstate your driving privileges following an uninsured accident, traffic-related offense (like a DUI), or license suspension. In some cases, you may need an SR-22 for up to 3 years — if you drove without insurance…